smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Chicks Galore

Photography by Hooman Fakhteh (Rasht, Iran); Rasht, Iran

“A recent Alzheimer’s Association report estimated that more than 15 million Americans are providing unpaid care to a loved one with dementia.”

official-nhl:

Someone asked us recently how to be a proper hockey fan during the NHL playoffs and they start tomorrow! Which makes this extremely important. 

So here I am, in gif glory, How to be a Hockey Fan: During the Playoffs 

The first service that one owes to others in the fellowship consists in listening to them. Just as love to God begins with listening to His Word, so the beginning of love for the brethren is learning to listen to them. It is God’s love for us that He not only gives us His Word but also lends us His ear. So it is His work that we do for our brother when we learn to listen to him. Christians, especially ministers, so often think they must always contribute something hen they are in the company of others, that this is the one service they have to render. they forget that listening can be a greater service than speaking.

Many people are looking for an ear that will listen. They do not find it among Christians, because these Christians are talking where they should be listening. But he who can no longer listen to his brother will soon be no longer listening to God either.

Dietrich Bonhoeffer

I just love this quote. Our show on his life and legacy is worth a listen.

(via beingblog)

sous chef

nationalgeographicmagazine:

Children’s smile
Photo and caption by Aleksandr Romanov
Life behind polar circle
Location: Tazovsky peninsula, Jamalonenetsky district, Russia

(via npr)

from Volf’s “Free of Charge”

postgraphics:

From toilet to turbine

This summer, D.C. Water will begin using something it has a lot of (yes, poop, although folks there call it “biosolids”) to generate something it needs: electricity. Key to the $470 million system is a unique process, the first of its kind in North America, created by Norwegian company Cambi. The process is called “thermal hydrolysis,” and the basic idea is to cook the biosolids into a recipe that methane-making microbes can’t resist, then burn the methane they produce to generate power. Here’s how the system will work.

(Read: Making power and fine fertilizer from sewage)

(via washingtonpost)